Sunday, August 30, 2009

Semenya's Story











Is The Semenya Case Old Wine in an African Bottle?! «By thefreeslave Is The Semenya Case Old Wine in an African Bottle?! August 29, 2009 by thefreeslave. The 10 Most Shocking Olympic Gender Scandals. Edit Stats Delete. 1. Dora Ratjen. For the 1936 Olympic games in Berlin, Adolf Hitler wanted to show the ...- http://afrospear.wordpress.com/
Bits & Pieces » Semenya gender controversyBy Jonco Mokgadi Caster Semenya (born 7 January 1991) is a South African middle-distance runner and world champion.[1][2] She won gold in the 800 m at the 2009 World Championships in Athletics with a time of 1:55.45 in the final. ...Bits & Pieces - http://bitsandpieces.us/

caster semenya pictures downloadcaster semenya pictures download: Fortunately, after the clean-up campaign against vulgar, this line is not the same as the door was covered Yan Zhao picture. However, there are some User first time to download a picture.2009 US NEWS - http://www.2009-us-news.biz/
Hard-hitting gender story about Caster Semenya situation ...By kwilder KW: I have excerpted the story from The Root/repost at Reclaim the Media below about Caster Semenya and gender testing. The story itself is even more controversial. One thing is that the article seems nearly cruel, in naming the ugly ...OntheWilderSide - http://wilderside.wordpress.com/

Pam's House Blend:: Defining "Normal" And "Freak" The "Christian" Way
By Autumn Sandeen Well, Lynn Green -- the blogmistress of the Hicktown Press and point person behind Christian Women For Jesus -- has stated that she believes that Caster Semenya is a "freak of nature." She apologized for expressing that thought that ...Pam's House Blend - Front Page - http://www.pamshouseblend.com/
Industrial Something » Race and sex struggleBy jon So it's with mixed feelings that I read about Semenya's situation. A runner from South Africa, recently she has had her gender questioned. It's a tough seat to be in, and I'm not sure what I think. On one hand, we need fair categories ...Industrial Something - http://industrialsomething.org/
Caster Semenya – a little girl lost Jozikids Blog
By jozikids As a parent, we teach our children acceptance. We teach them to accept themselves, their faults and their strengths. We teach them that different is simple that.Jozikids Blog - http://jozikids.co.za/blog/
@BOOKSA Twitter Weekly Updates 2009-08-30 BOOK SA - NewsBy Ben - Editor RT @JohoBooks: Hestrie Cloete het simpatie met Caster Semenya http://book.co.za/cc4k #; Julia Denny-Dimitriou Reviews The Book of Jacob by Greg Fried and Lisa Lazarus http://book.co.za/hFX3 #; Intoducing Little White Bakkie, ...BOOK SA - News - http://news.book.co.za/blog/
A proud village welcomes back Caster Semenya its heroine : Myafri
By admin You are here: Home / Africa News / A proud village welcomes back Caster Semenya its heroine. A proud village welcomes back Caster Semenya its heroine. August 30, 2009 by admin. Filed under Africa News · Leave a Comment ...Myafri - http://www.myafri.com/

Gender row athlete: What is intersexuality?




The case of South African athlete Caster Semenya has sparked worldwide interest following reports that she will be tested by sporting officials to determine whether she is male or female.

Semenya celebrates her gold, which came just hours after the IAAF called for a gender test on the athlete.

The 18-year-old won gold in the 800 meters race Wednesday but she may be forced to return the medal if she fails a gender-verification test imposed by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).
According to media reports, the IAAF are testing to see whether Semenya has a rare genetic disorder that means she has female genitalia but male chromosomes.
This condition, known as intersex, is commonly referred to as hermaphroditism. (Some support groups say that the term "hermaphroditism" can be inaccurate and offensive, as it implies that someone is both fully male and fully female, which is a physiologic impossibility.)
According to the Intersex Society of North America, (ISNA) intersex is a "general term used for a variety of conditions in which a person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn't seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male."
"For example, a person might be born appearing to be female on the outside, but having mostly male-typical anatomy on the inside," a statement on the society's Web site says.
Vital Signs
Each month CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta brings viewers health stories from around the world.
See more from the show »
There are around 20 to 30 types of biological "intersex" conditions, each of them affecting the body in different ways.
Some people are born with both male and female reproductive organs, while others like intersex activist Hida Viloria are born biologically female yet possess masculine-looking genitalia.
Others have a form known as Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) where the person is totally insensitive to any male hormones known as androgens.
Dr. Peter Bowen-Simpkins of the UK's Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists told CNN: "Intersexuality is incredibly rare, the one I've seen most commonly and one which affects 1 in 13,000 people worldwide is AIS."
Don't Miss
Women's world champion Semenya faces gender test
"In a woman your androgen receptors leads you to grow pubic hair, for instance," he explained. "If you are insensitive to androgens, you will grow up looking like a girl because the default of all human beings is female.
"However if the body, when it's developing, is not guided into turning into a male, then it will always be female," he told CNN.
He added: "This South African athlete couldn't have AIS because her problem is that it is suggested that she looks rather male, she's got a big jaw and has very little breast development, but so many athletes are like that, " he added.
"But if she had AIS she would be all female and wouldn't have the advantage of the testosterone androgen, which make men's bones grow and makes them faster than a woman."
To test Semenya's gender, Dr. Bowen-Simpkins said the IAAF test would involve her being examined by a gynecologist to see what her genitals look like. Semenya would also have an ultrasound to see if she has all the normal female reproductive organs.
Doctors would also need an hormonal test to see if she had an excess of testosterone and they would also test her chromosomes.
People who are intersex could also have the condition and not be aware of it, as was the case of Indian athlete Santhi Soundarajan, who failed a gender test at the 2006 Asian games and was stripped of her medal. She later attempted suicide, survived and recently announced she was becoming a coach.
Intersex conditions occur in one out of every 2,000 births in the United States, according to the Rohnert Park, California-based Intersex Society of North America.
For more than half a century it was common for doctors to carry out reversal operations, either through castration or constructing a new vagina, on babies whose genitals were seen as either too big or too small.
Many of these people later spoke out and said that these surgeries caused them trauma and confusion in adult life.
Most groups campaigning for intersex people now advocate that doctors should not perform medically unnecessary genital surgeries on intersex babies to make them male or female.
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If You Question This Lady's Ovaries, You're A Hatemonger
















While it may be cruel to so publicly question Caster Semenya's gender, it's not a ridiculous question. But just keep in mind you're being racist. What?
That's the assertion made by Sello Rabothata, deputy sports editor at South Africa's Sowetan, in an op-ed in yesterday's Guardian. Honestly, we'd nominate this for Worst American Sports Writing, if it were American. He starts it off with a doozy:
This is just pure unadulterated jealousy and it's being done because she is black and African!
I'm not sure exclamation points in your lede make for a convincing argument, but whatever. Rabothata goes on to argue that this is a common accusation hurled at South African athletes, bringing up the case of a soccer player accused by her Ghanaian opponents of being a man. Not sure if you can make the case that that one was due to their jealously at her being "black and African."
She is best described as a tomboy. She likes, among other things, wrestling. She also has a deep voice. It seems she also sports a moustache. All these features make the allegation seem likely. But, who has a right to argue with her parents when they say their child is a girl? Shouldn't they be the ones to know?
So if I went to compete in women's track and field, I'd be allowed to as long as my parents will vouch for my womanhood? Sounds good. I'd still get smoked, but that's not the point. The point is, I agree we should wait for the testing before we attack her. Or defend her?
For us in South Africa, Semenya is our golden girl and no amount of jealousy or false allegations are going to convince us otherwise.
So because you like her and she's your nationality, you refuse to entertain questions about her? Got it.
Semenya, Our Queen Of The 800m [Guardian]

Saturday, August 29, 2009

The Gender Persecution Of Caster Semenya


The Gender Persecution Of Caster SemenyaBy gaylife Some reacted to Semenya's victory as expected: singing, dancing, and horn-blowing from fellow South-Africans as she arrived in Johannesburg following the race. Others met her with disbelief and disgust. "Just look at her," Russian ...About Gay Life - http://gaylife.about.com/b/







Pam's House Blend:: Thursday Evening This & That: Open ThreadBy Autumn Sandeen "Christian" athletic group 4 WINDS's Statement on Woman's 800 Meters Gold Medalist Caster Semenya's Sex Investigation: Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the ex-wife of former President Nelson Mandela, said that people do not have the right to ...Pam's House Blend - Front Page - http://www.pamshouseblend.com/



Crowds Greet Gold Girl - modernghana.com/sports newsAFP news agency quoted her uncle, Ben Semenya, as saying: "Caster is a girl... I am not worried about that too much. Caster is like my child. I know where she comes from. For myself, I know Caster is a girl." ...Sports News - http://www.modernghana.com/
The levels of hormones Semenya's within an acceptable range ...By Full Text RSS Builder Runner from South Africa and the world 800 meters champion Caster Semenya was found that higher than normal levels of testosterone when tested by the South African officials, but remained within the range allowed for female athletes ...News - http://www.tiimi.net/
Running champion Semenya celebrated in home village _ far from ...By Bureau News South African villagers praise world championGA-MASEHLONG, South Africa — Villagers in northern South Africa are celebrating and supporting their world track champion who is the subject of gender tests.Breaking News - http://blog.taragana.com/n/
“IF CASTER [SEMENYA] IS A BOY, I'M A BOY” « AFRICA IS A COUNTRYBy Sean My friend Herman Wasserman and I wrote an op-ed for The Observers, the website of the French TV station, France24, on the manufactured controversy around Caster Semenya, the new 800 m woman's track and field world champion: ...AFRICA IS A COUNTRY - http://africasacountry.wordpress.com/
South Africa's Warm Welcome for Caster Semenya Masks the Reality ...By Anne Smart Sensuality, Cultural Creatives, Daily News, Trends, Conscious Living, Politics, Women's News, Global Development, Sensual Lifestyle, Sexy Food, Simple Pleasures, Travel, Health & Wellbeing, Global Culture.Beyond Burqas - http://www.anneofcarversville.com/beyond-burqas
South African villagers praise Caster Semenya - FOX23 NewsVillagers in northern South Africa are celebrating and supporting their world track champion who is the subject of gender tests.Fox 23: World News - http://www.fox23.com/news/world/
caster semenya photosCaster Semenya Photos Glen or Glenda of Track World?20 Aug 2009 by info@personalmoneystore.com (Personal Money Store) caster semenya pictures Caster Semenya photos are all over the Web right now. Is the 18-year-old South African ...2009 US NEWS - http://www.2009-us-news.biz/
Media Fail – Castor Semenya Female2FemaleBy Laura “Lemme guarantee you that if your daughter was a good 800m athlete you would ask for a gender test on Semenya. It would be your right, you would exercise it, and it should not raise an eyebrow. You would want to know that your daughter ...Female2Female - http://www.female2female.co.za/

Friday, August 28, 2009

Bolt sets searing pace in Zurich

Jamaica's Usain Bolt followed last week's record-breaking exploits at the World Championships with another blisteringly fast 100m in Zurich.
The world and Olympic champion, who set a world best of 9.58 seconds in Berlin, came from behind to beat compatriot Asafa Powell in a time of 9.81.
Powell finished in 9.88, followed by Americans Darvis Patton (9.95) and Michael Rodgers in 9.98.
Sanya Richards won the 400m to retain hope of the $1m Golden League jackpot.
The American won in 48.94 seconds, the fastest time in the world this year, with Britain's Christine Ohuruogu down in fourth place in 50.41, and Nicola Sanders sixth in 51.02.
I would say this was a shaky race
Usain Bolt
Richards needs to win the 400m in the last Golden League meet in Brussels next week to be one of the jackpot winners - the prize goes to the athlete or athletes who win their event in all six of the Golden League meets.
"I stayed in my race and waited until the top when I knew I'd be strong," said Richards.
"The jackpot for some reason doesn't add a lot of pressure or stress on me. I'm going in very confident that, as long as I execute, I know I can win."
Russian pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva also remains in the hunt after setting a new world record of 5.06 metres, as does Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele who won the 5,000m in 12 minutes 52.32.
Kerron Stewart of Jamaica saw her jackpot challenge end as she came second in the women's 100m behind Carmelita Jeter, the American finishing in 10.86.
And Britain's Lisa Dobriskey (3:59.50) followed up her 1500m bronze medal in Berlin with a third-placed finish behind world champion Maryam Yusuf Jamal of Bahrain and American Anna Willard.

Highlights - Bolt's golden championships (UK users only)
LaShawn Merritt of the USA repeated last week's 400m victory as he ran 44.21 to again finish ahead of Jeremy Wariner (44.62).
Bolt was not entirely happy with his form despite setting one of the fastest times in history.
"I would say this was a shaky race," he said. "My body was sitting at the start, I was a little bit tired through the race.
"All things considered, the time is not bad. I needed to pick up my speed as my body did not respond well to the race."
Powell, the bronze medallist in Berlin, said: "I have 9.6 in my legs and at my next meet I'm going to put it on the track. Everyone has to go out with that in mind, that they can beat Usain.
"He's way ahead of the crowd right now but we're really playing catch-up. We'll get there somehow. Usain is taking the sport to a whole different level and we are going up there to join him."
Britain's Tyrone Edgar finished last in the 100m in 10.28.
Bolt later led Jamaica to victory in the 4x100m relay, clocking 37.70 to the USA's 37.73.














Thursday, August 27, 2009

Is Caster Semenya a woman, and the issues surrounding androgen insensitivity syndrome







is the South African track and field star who recently was engulfed in controversy at the recently concluded World Track and Field Championships.
Turns out, there are some who are questioning her gender, and subsequently, tests are being conducted to see if she is really a woman.
It’s not as cut and dry as it appears.
Consider the possibility of androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), where, according to this piece in TIME.com, is “a condition in which a genetic male is resistant to androgens, the male sex hormones that include testosterone. In such cases, the testes never descend from the abdomen and the genitalia may resemble female genitalia.”
With one’s body insensitive to testosterone, more is subsequently produced. But there is little data as to whether this increased level of testosterone confers an athletic advantage.
In fact, if Miss Semenya really had AIS, it’s likely that she, along with her doctors and family, isn’t even aware of it. According to Rob Ritchie, a urological surgeon at Oxford University, “It is quite common for neither an individual with AIS nor her parents to realize that she is genetically male. Indeed, AIS is sometimes diagnosed at fertility clinics only when women seek help because of their inability to become pregnant.”
This is a sensitive situation for Miss Semenya, whose life may be irrevocably altered by the test findings. Add in the fact that the world is speculating about whether she is indeed a female or not, will only add to the challenges that are not of her own doing.

Is Caster Semenya Really a Man? The Answer Won't Be Simple











World champion athlete Caster Semenya enjoyed a hero’s welcome on her return home to South Africa, but speculation surrounding her gender rumbles on with the revelation that earlier testing showed she has higher-than-average testosterone levels.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Semenya returns to rapturous welcome


Hundreds of fans turned out to show their support for South Africa's 800 metre world champion, Caster Semenya.
The athlete returned from the World Athletics Championships in Berlin with a gold medal, but questions still remain about her biological gender.

South Africa spread red carpet for Semenya



This a story of misfortune turning to fortune. Caster Semenya would just have been another medallist at the just concluded 12th IAAF World Championship in Berlin, Germany, but for the gender row.
Thanks to the row, Semanya is not only etched in our memory forever; her road to fortune begins when she arrives South Africa this week from Berlin.
Heroine’s welcome
South African people and government are planning a heroine’s welcome when she comes home this week. Home Affairs Minister, Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, has said of the 800-metre gold medallist whose boyish looks led to the test following her impressive performance at the world championships in
Berlin:
“Caster deserves our support as a nation against the onslaught being waged against her,” Dlamini Zuma said in a statement.
“To us Caster is simply the best 800-metre woman World Champion and must be given a heroine’s welcome upon [her] return to South Africa Tuesday,” the minister said.
The gender-testing debate has sparked outrage in the 18-year-old’s home country, with the ruling party and its youth and women’s wings saying the test smacked of racism and sexism.
Made South Africa proud
Dlamini Zuma said that despite the doubts expressed about Semenya’s gender, she had made her country proud.
“Accordingly, all of us as South Africans, especially women, must rally around Caster and reject with the contempt it deserves the insinuations being made about her gender.”
African National Congress youth league spokesman Floyd Shivambu told AFP that the group was organising a massive welcome home with the women’s league, student organisations and other formations at the airport on Tuesday.
“We will be going there to welcome her. There are going to be mobs of people at the airport,” he said, refusing to give more details on the plans. “If we speak about it to the public it is not going to be a surprise.”
IAAF denounced ANC youth league leader, Julius Malema, has denounced the decision by the International
Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the sport’s governing body, to test Semenya’ gender as “racist and sexist”.
Malema said Semenya was being tested because she was black and had surpassed her European competitors, according to the Sunday Independent.
Her father, Jacob Semenya, told the newspaper he felt physically sick at the allegations, admitting his daughter had always dressed like a boy and “if you speak to her on the phone you might mistake her for a man.”
“But I used to change her nappy, and I know she is a woman. What better proof do you need?”
Devastated Semanya
A devastated Semenya nearly boycotted the awards ceremony after she won the 800-metre race on Wednesday in 1 minute 55.45 seconds—the best time in the world this year—beating her closest competitors by a huge two-and-a-half seconds.
The teenager from a rural village in the impoverished Limpopo province in northern South Africa was hesitant to take to the podium.
“She is not rejoicing. She (didn’t) want the medal,” Athletics South Africa president Leonard Chuene said last week.
The furor has sparked debates over often grey areas of gender, chromosomes and hormones, and what makes a woman a woman, in a row that has overshadowed one of the best performances by a South African athlete in recent years.
Test result
Semenya underwent tests by an endocrinologist, gynaecologist, psychologist and other experts and the results are expected to take weeks.
The IAAF has stated it is unlikely she will be stripped of her title if she fails the test. Semenya was one of only two gold medallists for South Africa, the other coming in the men’s 800-metre event, which was won by 28-year-old
Mbulaeni Mulaudzi. He hails from the same region, Limpopo.

Update on Caster Semenya

New twist in Semenya gender saga

Tests have revealed Caster Semenya's testosterone level to be three times higher than those normally expected in a female sample, BBC Sport understands.Analysis prior to the World Athletics Championships and the 18-year-old's big improvement prompted calls for a gender test from the sport's governing body.It was made public only hours before the South African, who has been backed by her nation, won the 800m in Berlin.A high level of the hormone does not always equate to a failed drugs test.But the news will only increase speculation surrounding Semenya, who arrived back in South Africa to a rapturous welcome on Tuesday.Semenya was welcomed by hundreds of well-wishers on her return to South AfricaHundreds turned out in Johannesburg to greet the teenager, who has stunned the athletics world with her performances this season.She ran a time of one minute, 56.72 seconds in Bambous in July to smash her previous personal best by more than seven seconds.She also broke Zola Budd's long-standing South African record and arrived at the World Championships as the newly crowned African junior champion.Then in Berlin she left her rivals trailing to win gold in a time of 1:55.45.Defending champion Janeth Jepkosgei was second, a massive 2.45 seconds adrift, with Britain's Jenny Meadows taking the bronze medal.Only hours before the race, it leaked out that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) had demanded Semenya take a gender test amid fears she should not be allowed to run as a woman.It has since emerged that news of the test only became public knowledge because a fax was sent to the wrong person.It has also been revealed that following the findings of initial tests, the South Africans were asked by the IAAF to withdraw her from the team at the World Championships.Since then, both her family and South African athletics chiefs have leapt to her defence, insisting she is 100% female."Caster is a girl. I am not worried about that too much," said her uncle on her arrival back in South Africa."Caster is like my child. I know where she comes from. For myself, I know Caster is a girl."Leonard Chuene, president of Athletics South Africa (ASA), has resigned from his seat on the IAAF board in protest against the organisation's treatment of Semenya."It will not be fair for me to attack the IAAF as a council member and representative of South Africa. It is a conflict of interest," Chuene told BBC's Newshour programme.Chuene also asked that the issue be laid to rest."We have not once, as ASA, doubted her," he said. "It's very simple - she's a girl."We took this child to Poland to the junior championship under the IAAF. Why was there no story about it? She was accepted there."No-one said anything there because she did not do anything special. She is the same girl."Testosterone levels can vary widely, which makes it hard to detect possible infractions.When analysis shows an athlete to have a raised level, they are monitored at regular intervals over a set period to establish what their underlying levels would be.That is then used as a marker for the future, so any sharp differences immediately stand out as suspicious.An analysis of Semenya's testosterone levels was carried out in South Africa and it is understood that this information contributed to the IAAF's decision to request the ASA carry out a detailed "gender verification" test on the athlete.Those medical tests are said to be ongoing, with the results not expected for several weeks.On Sunday, IAAF president Lamine Diack admitted the affair could have been treated with more sensitivity."It should not even have become an issue if the confidentiality had been respected," he said. "There was a leak of confidentiality at some point and this led to some insensitive reactions."

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Semenya is home

Caster Semenya is home with the gold medal for 800ms. from Berlin 2009

Martin Samuel: We've every right to bang on about sex


South Africa's teenage 800 metres world champion Caster Semenya gestures to her fans at the O.R Tambo international airport in Johannesburg .

Semenya the hero of South Africa

South Africa's teenage 800 metres world champion Caster Semenya gestures to her fans at the O.R Tambo international airport in Johannesburg Read more:


Caster Semenya arrives home

Caster Semenya arrives home in South Africa to a heroine's welcome amid claims she has three times the normal level of testosterone
Over 1,000 fans sang and danced in support of Caster Semenya, the controversial runner who is undergoing gender testing, on her triumphant return to South Africa.
Semenya arrived with other members of the South African team after her 800-metre win at the world championships in Berlin.
Fans organised by women's rights and political groups, school sports teams and delighted individuals ringed the balcony overlooking the arrivals hall blowing plastic horns known as vuvuzelas and dancing in celebration. Read more:

Caster Semenya arrives home


Caster Semenya arrives home in South Africa to a heroine's welcome amid claims she has three times the normal level of testosteroneRead more: Over 1,000 fans sang and danced in support of Caster Semenya, the controversial runner who is undergoing gender testing, on her triumphant return to South Africa.
Semenya arrived with other members of the South African team after her 800-metre win at the world championships in Berlin.
Fans organised by women's rights and political groups, school sports teams and delighted individuals ringed the balcony overlooking the arrivals hall blowing plastic horns known as vuvuzelas and dancing in celebration. Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1208887/Caster-Semenya-arrives-home-South-Africa-heroines-welcome-fans-descend-airport.html#ixzz0PNaIqDPG


Semenya had elevated testosterone in early tests


World women's 800m sprint champion Caster Semenya has returned high levels of testosterone in preliminary medical tests, according to UK paper The Daily Telegraph.
The paper reports these elevated results were derived from tests carried out before the start of the IAAF world championships held in Berlin.
The early data provided impetus to the IAAF's decision to have Semenya's gender verified.
Official medical tests results on the runner are not expected for several weeks.
The IAAF has expressed it's regret that the row has become public knowledge as it should have remained a confidential matter until the test results were returned.
"It should not even have become an issue if the confidentiality had been respected. There was a leak of confidentiality at some point and this led to some insensitive reactions," said an IAAF spokesman.
Meanwhile, Semenya returned home to South Africa which has embraced the embattled runner.
The country's parliament plans to file a complaint with the United Nations Commissioner of Human Rights over the athlete's treatment.
It will argue the gender verification tests are a "gross and severe undermining of rights and privacy".
Her supporters in South Africa have claimed that while she may have always looked boyish Semenya has nothing to answer for. And while tests will soon decide whether the IAAF decision was correct, her plight has gone global.
Among the loudest protesters have been the Intersex community, which speaks in support of those born without the 'normal' XX and XY chromosomes owned, respectively, by the female and male majority.
To be classed as 'intersex', according to the International Organisation of Intersexes (OII), "is not as rare as often believed and many people are intersexed, although it may not be visible at birth".
A petition has also been launched by the San Francisco-based National Sexuality Resource Center (NSRC), demanding the IAAF "stay out of Caster Semenya's pants".
"Your efforts to make champion Caster Semenya 'prove' she is a woman are shameful and unnecessary, and undermine the integrity and dignity of women athletes," said the NSRC.
"Requiring select athletes -- based purely on looks -- to undergo 'scientific' testing that others do not is unfair and humiliating."
Perhaps the most notorious gender case in sport is that of Stalislawa Walasiewicz, a female Polish sprinter who won 100m gold at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles as Stella Walsh.
It was only after she was shot dead in 1980 that an autopsy revealed Walsh as possessing male genitalia.
However, while those revelations finally ended years of suspicion surrounding Walsh, there is a genetic 'grey area' which appears to lend itself to open discrimination.
Three years ago India's Santhi Soundarajan found herself in a similar position as Semenya.
She was stripped of the silver medal she won in the women's 800m at the 2006 Asian Games in Qatar after she 'failed' a sex test ordered by the Indian Olympic Association (IOA).
Sent home from the Games, Soundarajan was left humiliated, and attempted suicide

CASTER SEMENYA - 800m WORLD CHAMPION
















Caster Semenya became the new darling of South African athletics when she won the gold medal in the 800 metres at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin in an impressive style on August 19.
Semenya followed the same tactics as in the semi-finals and held off any challenges her opponents could muster to stride to an easy victory in 1:55,45 defeating Kenya’s Janeth Kepkosgei Busienei (1:57,90) and Britain’s Jennifer Meadows (1:54,93). Semenya’s time is a world leading performance for 2009 and also bettered her own South African record.
She went to the front from the start and kept her position with Kepkosgei when they passed the 400m mark in 56, 83 seconds. Immediately after the bell, she went ahead and gradually opened a gap. She entered the final straight well ahead and from then on it was clear that no one will keep her from the gold medal.
Semenya’s talents were first observed in 2007 when she clocked 2:09,35 and finished second at the National Schools Championships in Port Elizabeth. A few weeks later she finished fifth at the Southern African regional meeting.
In 2008 she went to the IAAF World Junior Championships and although she gained valuable experience, she was eliminated in the heats of the 800m. Three months later she won the 800m at the Commonwealth Youth Games in Pune, India, in 2:04, 23 and evidence of her talents were clear. After completing her matric in Polokwane, she then moved to Pretoria to be with her new coach Michael Seme.
On 6 March this year she broke Zola Budd’s 25 year old junior record in the 800 metres when she clocked 2:00, 58 at the Yellow Pages meeting in Germiston, and then followed with a world-class-performance of 1:56,72 at the African Junior Championships in Mauritius.
KHOTSO MOKOENA-SILVER MEDALIST
South Africa won a second medal at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics when Khotso Mokoena finished in the silver medal position behind America’s Dwight Phillips in the long jump.
Mokoena, the reigning Olympic silver medalist and the World Indoor Champion, recorded a distance of 8,47m to trail Phillips by seven centimetres.
“The competition was pleasant. I have the silver medal, I will not complain. I was however disappointed with my first jump which was a no jump because it was quite far. But that is part of the game.
“After that mishap I said to myself that I have to keep going all out because it was quite close between Phillips and me. I am satisfied because I gave it all that I could,” explained Mokoena who started with a no jump, then unleashed his best effort of 8,47m, and followed it up with jumps of 8,31m and 8,19m before he concluded with another two no jumps.
Phillips, who is also the world ‘s leading jumper this year with 8,74m, is also known as a master tactician, and it was no surprise that he opened with his best effort of 8,54m to put pressure on his opponents.
“When Khotso jumped 8,47m I was not really worried because I jumped from about ten centimetres behind the board, and knew that I could go further,” said a jubilant Phillips. This was his third World Championships long jump gold medal.
Irving Saladino, the defending World Champion and 2008 Olympic Champion, bowed out of the competition after three no jumps.
MBULAENI MULAUDZI-800m WORLD CHAMPION
The popular 28-year old South African 800 metres runner was grimly determined to add the coveted gold medal to his already impressive collection in his career, when he performed his on Sunday, 23 August.
Mulaudzi’s feat also brought to South Africa their third medal and the triumphant team will return home with two gold medals and one silver medal finishing in 9th position on the medals table. Earlier in the Championships Caster Semenya won gold in the 800 metres and Khotso Mokoena silver in the long jump.
Mulaudzi changed his tactics in Sunday’s final at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics in Berlin when he took the lead and control of the final of the 800 metres from the gun and fought off any challenge that his opponents had.
The strongly built Mulaudzi gave an exhibition of power running seldom seen from him as he powered through the first 400 metres in 53,44 seconds and kept on putting on the pressure in the final 400 metres.
Over the last 100 metres he had to hold off a strong challenge from Alfred Yego and Yusuf Kamel but held on to win in 1:45,29 – six hundredths of second ahead of his two rivals who were both credited with a time of 1:45,35 in second and third place respectively.
SA MARATHON TEAM – FIFTH POSITION
Athletics South Africa’s plan to set up a training camp at Potchefstroom and to obtain the services of Kenyan coach Danson Muchoki bore fruit on Saturday, 22 August when the marathon team had an excellent result in the IAAF World Championships marathon finishing all three in the top 22 and snatching fifth place in the team competition.
The three runners, Norman Dlomo, Johannes Kekana and Coolboy Ngamole, definitely learnt, amongst others, much about team tactics during the camp and this time around they entered the marathon with a plan.
Unlike as happened in the past with South Africa marathon runners, this year’s trio entered this year’s race planning to work together and to cement a good performance in the team competition.
The hand of their Kenyan coach could be seen throughout the race as they stuck to their plan and in the end Dlomo crossed the line in 12th place in a time of 2:14:39, Kekana came in 17th in 2:15:28 and Ngamole 22nd in 2:16:20. All three recorded their season best times.
This enabled them to snatch fifth place in the World Marathon Cup competition with a time of 6:46:27 and walk off with a team prize of 8000 US dollars.
The World Marathon Cup forms part of the World Championships marathon.
They were ahead of countries like Brazil, Russia, Australia, Germany, France, Tanzania and Korea
Tanith Maxwell was the only South African athlete in the women’s race and finished in 45th place in a time of 2:41:48.

SOUTH AFRICA HAS REASON TO CELEBRATE AS THEY TAKE OVER THE 800m


JOHANNESBURG, TUESDAY, 25 AUGUST 2009: South Africa finished 9th at the World Championships with two golds and one silver. This was South Africa’s best position considering that in the last two editions of the Championships they failed to bring back any silverware.

Semenya given rousing South African receptionStory Highlights

Story Highlights
800 meters world champion Caster Semenya receives a rousing home-coming
Semenya returns to South Africa after claiming gold medal in Berlin last week
The Teenager made global headlines after doubts were raised over her gender ters world champion Caster Semenya received a rousing welcome after touching down in Johannesburg with her South African team-mates on Tuesday.
New 800 me
Semenya shows off her gold medal after returning to South Africa as the world 800m champion.
more photos »

The 18-year-old, who made global headlines last week after doubts were raised over her gender at the World Championships, was accompanied by the country's two other medallists from Berlin -- men's 800m champion Mbulaeni Mulaudzi and long-jump silver medallist Khotso Mokoena.
Thousands of supporters crammed the OR Tambo International Airport -- waving placards, singing, dancing and simply hoping to catch a glimpse of the teenage heroine.
Crowds throng as Semenya returns home
A delegation from the government ruling African National Congress' women's league were among the crowd along with the country's minister for women, children and disabilities Noluthando Mayende-Sibiya and Winnie Madikizela Mandela -- the ex-wife of former president Nelson Mandela.
Leonard Chuene, president of Athletics South Africa (ASA) was full of praise for Semenya and called for the matter over her gender to be laid to rest.
Caster Semenya's return in pictures »
He told reporters: "We have not once, as ASA, doubted her. It's very simple: She's a girl. We took this child to Poland to the junior championship under the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).
"Why was there no story about it? She was accepted there. No-one said anything there because she did not do anything special.
"She is the same girl. No-one asked why did we take her. She went to Mauritius and ran well, suddenly everyone noticed her. You say we didn't do much to protect her. What did you want us to do?
"As ASA we didn't have any of this information (on her gender) that people wanted us to protest about. When you go to dope testing, you go with a woman and she can see you are a woman.
"When you are born, you can see whether you are a boy or girl. You don't test children in the lab to confirm."
Last Wednesday, Semenya won gold in the two-lap race at the Olympic Stadium, crossing the line in a personal best of one minute 55.45 seconds -- also the fastest time of 2009 -- to finish ahead of defending champion Janeth Jepkosgei of Kenya and Great Britain's Jenny Meadows.
Her performance came after the IAAF earlier revealed they had been investigating Semenya's gender following her breakthrough performance in winning the African junior championship title at the end of July.
She ran a stunning time of 1:56.7 2 seconds in Mauritius - at the time striking almost four seconds off her previous best time -- and her sudden rise raised many questions.














New twist in Semenya gender saga


Tests have revealed Caster Semenya's testosterone level to be three times higher than those normally expected in a female sample, BBC Sport understands.
Analysis prior to the World Athletics Championships and the 18-year-old's big improvement prompted calls for a gender test from the sport's governing body.
It was made public only hours before the South African, who has been backed by her nation, won the 800m in Berlin.
A high level of the hormone does not always equate to a failed a drugs test.
But the news will only increase speculation surrounding Semenya, who arrived back in South Africa to a rapturous welcome on Tuesday.
Semenya was welcomed by hundreds of well-wishers on her return to South Africa
Hundreds turned out in Johannesburg to greet the teenager, who has stunned the athletics world with her performances this season.
She ran a time of one minute, 56.72 seconds in Bambous in July to smash her previous personal best by more than seven seconds.
She also broke Zola Budd's long-standing South African record and arrived at the World Championships as the newly crowned African junior champion.
Then in Berlin she left her rivals trailing to win gold in a time of 1:55.45.
Defending champion Janeth Jepkosgei was second, a massive 2.45 seconds adrift, with Britain's Jenny Meadows taking the bronze medal.
Only hours before the race, it leaked out that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) had demanded Semenya take a gender test amid fears she should not be allowed to run as a woman.
It has since emerged that news of the test only became public knowledge because a fax was sent to the wrong person.
Caster is like my child. I know where she comes from. For myself, I know Caster is a girl
Semenya's uncle
Since then, both her family and South African athletics chiefs have leapt to her defence, insisting she is 100% female.
"Caster is a girl. I am not worried about that too much," said her uncle on her arrival back in South Africa.
"Caster is like my child. I know where she comes from. For myself, I know Caster is a girl."
Leonard Chuene, president of Athletics South Africa (ASA), has called for the matter over Semenya's gender to be laid to rest.
"We have not once, as ASA, doubted her. It's very simple: She's a girl," he added.
"We took this child to Poland to the junior championship under the IAAF. Why was there no story about it? She was accepted there.
"No-one said anything there because she did not do anything special. She is the same girl."
Semenya has been humiliated - Holmes
Testosterone levels can vary widely, which makes it hard to detect possible infractions.
When analysis shows an athlete to have a raised level, they are monitored at regular intervals over a set period to establish what their underlying levels would be.
That is then used as a marker for the future, so any sharp differences immediately stand out as suspicious.
An analysis of Semenya's testosterone levels was carried out in South Africa and it is understood that this information contributed to the IAAF's decision to request the ASA carry out a detailed "gender verification" test on the athlete.
Those medical tests are said to be ongoing, with the results not expected for several weeks.
On Sunday, IAAF president Lamine Diack admitted the affair could have been treated with more sensitivity.
"It should not even have become an issue if the confidentiality had been respected," he said. "There was a leak of confidentiality at some point and this lead to some insensitive reactions."

Monday, August 24, 2009

Usain Bolt video

Nationality:Jamaican
Date of birth:21 August 1986 (1986-08-21) (age 23)[1]
Place of birth:Trelawny, Jamaica[2]
Height:1.96 m (6 ft 5 in)[3]

Weight:86 kg (190 lb; 13.5 st




Competitor for Jamaica


Men's athletics
Olympic Games Gold
2008 Beijing100 m Gold
2008 Beijing200 m Gold
2008 Beijing4 × 100 m relay
World Championships Gold
2009 Berlin100 m Gold
2009 Berlin200 m Gold
2009 Berlin
4 × 100 m relay Silver
2007 Osaka200 m Silver
2007 Osaka4 × 100 m relay
World Junior Championships Gold
2002 Kingston 200 mSilver
2002 Kingston 4 × 100 m relaySilver
2002 Kingston 4 × 400 m relay
World Youth Championships Gold
2003 Sherbrooke 200 m

Gender row: Your views
















South Africa's new 800m world champion Caster Semenya has been 'humiliated' for being asked to take a gender test, the country's athletics body has said.
BBC News website readers for South Africa and other African countries have been sending in their reaction to the news.





SOUTH AFRICAN REACTION





It think whoever is in charge should be reasonable enough to understand that people are born with different characteristics.
Doesn't the world knows that there are people born with a lot of abnormalities in their nature? They are only concerned over her manish looks because of her outstanding performance. Munyaradzi, Thohoyandou
What the IAAF did is disgusting to say the least. Is it because she is black or African? It is unfair to her and the whole country. We, as a country, are proud of her.Phanuel Chauke, Johannesburg
This is absolutely disgraceful! The treatment Caster Semenya has received just reeks of jealousy and racism.
However, it doesn't surprise me how an outstanding African athlete's gender comes into question. Would she have been treated differently if she were a white Eastern European?
Just look at the physical frame of the hammer throw and discuss athletes, yet their genders are not in question here.
Caster, you're a champion in my books. The poise and grace you are dealing with this matter makes you a true champion - on and off the track. Lesley, Port Elizabeth
It is clear that we judge people by their looks. Her mother has stated categorically that her daughter is a daughter, surely she should know. Now she has to be subjected to intense scrutiny simple because "some people" say that she does not conform to their idea of feminine looks.Guy Tanzer, Cape Town
The IAAF have insulted her dignity by the way they have publicly discussed the issue. Even drug cheats are not humiliated in this way before results are known.
I hope that when she is found to have passed the test, she will be recognised as a true champion in both her athletics and her grace in the face of this torment. Alan Thompson, Durban
This whole situation has been highly unfortunate as it should have been a moment of great joy for not only Caster, but South Africa as a whole.
I just hope it gets resolved soon as Caster's life has got to go on regardless of whatever some test may say. From speaking to a few friends and colleagues, South Africans are fully behind you Caster. Thank you for the effort and the GOLD!PB, Johannesburg





REACTION FROM REST OF AFRICA





Congratulations to Semenya. I am Kenyan and I was supporting Jepkosgei. Semenya ran a great race and the issues about her gender will be sorted later. I wonder how those claiming she is not female will react when they are proved wrong? Congratulations Semenya.Antony Kaara, Nairobi, Kenya
I think we should give her a chance. Let the doctors test her and clear her name once and for all. Then let's accept her as she is. There are many women out there who look like men.Moses Bukachi, Nairobi, Kenya.
She is being maligned simply because of her looks and build. It makes one wonder if this would have occurred if she was American.
Also, if she submits herself to a test and is confirmed a female, will the athletics body offer a public apology to her and her country?
I feel for the young woman as it is still a human soul with feelings and emotions that has to bear the shame of public conviction before a trial.Jimi Curtis-Joseph, Lagos, Nigeria
The IAAF needs to drop this issue. Firstly, why is it only after she won gold and broke the record that they want to subject her to this test? I wonder, if she hadn't won, would the IAAF have done the same thing? Irimayi Muzorewa, Harare, Zimbabwe
I'm inclined to believe that Semenya's crime was to win world races with great margins. Had she been average, there would have been no doubt about her gender. To this extent, the gender test order is a traumatic embarrassment. Shame on the IAAF! Mudukula Mukubi, Lusaka Zambia